Reformer Furnace

PLATFORMING PROCESS.
CATALYTIC REFORMING
Catalytic reforming is an important process used to convert low-octane naphthas into high-octane gasoline blending components called reformate. Reforming represents the total effect of numerous reactions such as cracking, polymerization, dehydrogenation, and isomerization taking place simultaneously. Depending on the properties of the naphtha feedstock (as measured by the paraffin, olefin, naphthene, and aromatic content) and catalysts used, reformates can be produced with very high concentrations of toluene, benzene, xylene, and other aromatics useful in gasoline blending and petrochemical processing. Hydrogen, a significant by-product, is separated from the reformate for recycling and use in other processes.
TABLE IV: 2-13. CATALYTIC REFORMING PROCESS
Feedstock From Process Typical products . . . . To
Desulfurized naphtha Coker Rearrange, dehydrogenate High octane gasoline . . Blending
Aromatics . . . . Petrochemical
Naphthene-rich fractions hydrocracker, hydrodesulfur Hydrogen . . . . Recycle, hydrotreat, etc.
Straight-run naphtha Atmospheric fractionator   Gas . . . . . . . . Gas plant